How To Grow A Pineapple From a Pineapple Top

Grow A Pineapple From a Pineapple TopI intended to do this as an update post to show how the pineapple I first planted 2 years ago has progressed, but it seems I never wrote a post about it then.  My little pineapple friend had outgrown it’s original pot, so I transferred it over to a larger home and added a new friend for it in its original place.

To plant a pineapple from the scraps, leave 1/2″ inch or so of the fruit when you remove the top.  Check underneath to see if there are any brown dots around the edges (these are the root buds).  If you don’t, keep removing thin slices of the fruit until you do.  Now carefully remove the lower 1 inch of the leaves so you have a small stem exposed.

This next part I have seen conflicting information about.  Some say to allow the pineapple top to dry for a few days before planting and others say to place it in water.  The little pineapple top below was done with the water method, and it doesn’t look quite as good as planting the pineapple top dry (how I did the larger plant above).  Both plants looked slightly unhappy at first before perking up though, so the smaller plant still might have a chance.  Even though it is a bit dry around the edges, there is some promising new growth in the center.  Either way you do this, water around the outside of the plant and not at the center as it can cause rot.  When planting, do not allow any soil to fall into the center of the plant or cover the stem with soil, only cover up to the top of the fruit.

Pineapples like well drained soil, so you can add vermiculite to the soil to help with this and keep them in a pot that drains.  Water daily to keep the soil wet, but not water logged, for the first week.  Water once a week after they are established and keep them in a place where they can get plenty of sun.

For those in a cooler climate, pineapples can be kept in pots and moved inside over the winter.  They will die if the temperature falls to 32 degrees or lower.  We move ours indoors well before that point to keep them happy.

Growing Sweet Potatoes In Hanging Planters

Growing Sweet Potatoes In Hanging Planters
Image credit: Grow Food Not Lawns

This is a great idea for those with limited gardening space! You won’t exactly be growing sweet potatoes in bulk, but you could make a great salad from the leaves and I like the idea of hanging plants being edible as well as beautiful. This is additional food garden square footage I had not yet considered. I need to do an experiment propagating some sweet potato vines soon so they have a chance to sprout before the weather gets warm!

Caution: while sweet potato leaves are not poisonous, common potato leaves are so don’t eat the leaves from those!

How To Grow Ginger

How To Grow A Ginger PlantGrowing ginger in your garden is really quite easy.  Purchase a fresh piece of ginger from your grocery or farmers market.  Look for a large piece with plenty of “nubs” and soak the root overnight in warm water before planting.

If you are in a northern climate where frost is a possibility, you will need to plant the ginger root in a pot that can be transferred indoors in the winter.  Either drill a hole in the bottom of the pot, or place rocks at the base for drainage.

Fill the pot with well draining soil almost to the rim.  Place the ginger root on top of the soil and cover with a thin (1/2″ to 1″) layer of dirt.  Water well and place the pot in a place that gets plenty of sunlight.

Ginger plants like to be watered regularly, but they do best in well drained soil.  When I did this experiment in our garden I tried to grow ginger in two pots, the one that received less water did much better than the one that received too much (that root rotted, an extremely stinky experience preparing that pot for the next planting).

After your ginger plant has matured, you can carefully harvest small portions of the root as needed without killing the plant.  If you are anything like us, we always end up buying much more ginger than we could use and it either rots in the refrigerator or ends up forgotten in the freezer, so having a ginger plant we can harvest from is a much more sustainable option.  If you try this let me know how the ginger does in your own garden!

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